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trauma

One of the Murdered Speaks

 Prince Vlad, a pseudonym the author of this post uses to protect his identity, shares an account of how he interviewed an El Salvadorian gang member after earning his trust, only to learn soon after that his informant had been murdered. By Prince Vlad In the first two months of this year, 234 people were […]

Bringing your research full circle

Oral history projects do not have static after lives, as this travel journal from Gwyn McClelland demonstrates. He reflects on his recent visit to Japan, where he returned to share the results of his research on the trauma resulting from the atomic bombing in Nagasaki. Meditating on his role as an outsider, he shares what […]

Researching emotions in interviews with former IRA prisoners

Oral History Review has a particular interest in the various methods oral history practitioners use to analyze interviews. We are delighted to preview Dieter Reinisch’s work exploring the emotions revealed in interviews with former Irish Republican Army prisoners, drawn from his larger project, An Oral History of Irish Republican Prisoners, 1971-2000. By Dieter Reinisch Particularly since […]

Author interview: Emma Vickers on Unexpected Trauma in Oral History Interviews

In her recent OHR article, “Unexpected Trauma in Oral Interviewing,” Emma Vickers argues that oral historians can draw on psychoanalytic theories to better equip for unexpected trauma in interviews. Here, she answers a few of our questions about ways to navigate trauma when interviewing. Can you explain what you mean by “unexpected trauma” in the […]

Listening again, digging deeper, & hearing moral injury

The authors of the recently published article “Oral History, Moral Injury, and Vietnam Veterans,” available online, share their thoughts on and experiences with “moral injury.”  By Philip F. Napoli, with contributions from Thomas Brinson, Neil Kenny, and Joan Furey. As part of the research for my book, Bringing It All Back Home: An Oral History […]

Listening Beyond the Sound Bites of Guantánamo Bay

Founder of Witness to Guantánamo, Peter Jan Honigsberg shares in this guest post, the origins and significance of this project that documents the experiences of those who have worked, lived, or were detained in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. By Peter Jan Honigsberg Witness to Guantánamo’s mission is to document on film the stories of people who have lived […]

On burnout, trauma, and self-care with Erin Jessee

View Post on the OUPblog Last week, Erin Jessee gave us a list of critical questions to ask to mitigate risk in oral history fieldwork. Today, we’ve invited Jessee back to the blog to talk more in-depth about her recently published article, “Managing Danger in Oral Historical Fieldwork,” spotting signs of trauma during interviews, and dealing with the sensitive […]

Learning to read emotions in oral history

View Post on OUP Blog  By Katie Holmes  The most recent issue of the OHR featured two stories on understanding emotion in oral history interviews. In one piece, Julian Simpson and Stephanie Snow asked what role humor plays in healthcare, and how to locate it in oral history. In another piece, Katie Holmes asks how […]

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